In Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet,” the star-crossed lovers are compared to a rose, lilies, and violets. What do these flowers represent in the story?

In Act 2, Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet, Romeo compares Juliet to a flower. The “what does romeo compare juliet to in act 2, scene 1” is the first comparison that he makes.

What does Romeo compare Juliet to Act 2? |

Juliet emerges on the balcony in Act Two, Scene 2, and Romeo instantly compares her to the sun. “Two of the loveliest stars in all the heaven, having some business, do implore her eyes to glitter in their spheres until they return,” Romeo says, comparing Juliet’s eyes to stars in the sky (2.2. 16-19).

Furthermore, what does Romeo compare Juliet to, and why does he do so?

Juliet is compared to light, the sun, and the stars by Romeo. He’s admiring her attractiveness and expressing his feelings for her. Juliet suggests that Romeo should alter or deny his name so that they may be together indefinitely without having to worry about their families’ rivalry. She wants him to refuse to call him by his given name.

In Act 2, what are Juliet’s concerns? Juliet inquires whether his motives are honorable as the two lovers make vows of love.” Juliet is concerned that she has been too pushy with Romeo, and that her private thoughts have been discovered. Juliet is concerned Romeo will be discovered later in the Act when the nurse calls for her.

Second, what does Romeo’s comparison of Juliet to the sun mean?

Romeo is waiting for Juliet to emerge from her balcony in Capulet’s orchard. Romeo compares Juliet to the rising sun in the east when she eventually comes out. The moon (another female) is “envious” of Juliet since she is significantly brighter and more gorgeous than it.

As Act 2 comes to a close, what is Friar Lawrence’s concern about Romeo and Juliet’s relationship?

The friar is concerned that Romeo may have slept with Rosaline in sin. Romeo tells him that this did not occur, and he goes on to detail his newfound love for Juliet, his wish to marry her, and his request that the friar approve to their marriage on the same day.

Answers to Related Questions

What does Romeo make a comparison between Juliet’s eyes and?

Juliet emerges on the balcony in Act Two, Scene 2, and Romeo instantly compares her to the sun. “Two of the loveliest stars in all the heaven, having some business, do implore her eyes to glitter in their spheres until they return,” Romeo says, comparing Juliet’s eyes to stars in the sky (2.2. 16-19).

In Act II, what is an example of foreshadowing?

The classic balcony scene is an excellent example of foreshadowing. Juliet believes that making love vows is “too hasty, too ill-advised, too hasty” (II. In this passage, Juliet talks explicitly about death, which is a second example of foreshadowing.

What does Romeo make a comparison between kissing and?

Juliet is being compared to a holy entity by Romeo. Romeo refers to his lips as “two blushing pilgrims,” extending the idea of a shrine for the saint, Juliet.

Lord Capulet gives two grounds for Tybalt’s detention.

Lord Capulet presents two reasons for restraining Tybalt from assaulting Romeo in Act I Scene 5 of William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. To begin, he adds, “Be content, gentle coz, and let him alone.” To be a moral and well-behaved adolescent.

What did Romeo refer to Juliet as?

But what lovely light filters through the window? Juliet is the sun, and the sun is the east.

Who is Juliet’s adversary?

Juliet Capulet is just a teenager when she meets and falls in love with Romeo Montague, a family nemesis. They married in secret.

Why is Juliet jealous of the moon?

Because it is compared to Rosaline’s face, the moon feels jealous. Why does he make the comparison between Juliet’s eyes and the stars? Romeo compares Juliet’s eyes to the stars because they twinkle like stars in the night.

Why is the nurse putting Juliet off?

Juliet is put off by the Nurse since she knows she will be waiting. She understands how essential marriage is to a restless adolescent, and she teases Juliet, milking the moment for all it’s worth.

What exactly does vestal livery imply?

Balcony Scene Glossary in Romeo and Juliet

Vestal livery] refers to the uniform (“livery”) worn by Diana’s virgins (“vestal”). ill and gloomy] The anaemic disease known as chlorosis, or green illness, is referred to by the term sick and green.

What is it that Juliet is terrified of?

Juliet is afraid that the sleeping potion made for her by Friar Lawrence will be poisonous, that it will not work (meaning she would have to marry Paris), or that it will wear off too soon, allowing her to wake up in a tomb and go insane with dread.

In Romeo and Juliet, what is an example of metaphorical language?

When Romeo sees the light on in Juliet’s chamber in Romeo and Juliet, he remarks, “It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.” (See II. ii. 3) This is an example of metaphor: Romeo uses the word “is” to compare Juliet to the sun, implying that she is dazzling, warm, and drives the night/darkness away.

In Romeo and Juliet, how old is Romeo?

Quick response. Romeo is never given an age by Shakespeare. Although his age ranges from 13 to 21, he is usually shown as being around the age of 16.

What does Act 2 of Romeo and Juliet entail?

Love vows are exchanged between Romeo and Juliet. Romeo and Juliet intend to marry the next day.

In Act 2 of Romeo and Juliet, what is the conflict?

Juliet enters, giving Paris the cold shoulder since she refuses to marry him. Juliet is torn between Romeo and Tybalt, and she can’t determine whose side she wants to be on. Romeo assassinated Tybalt, her cousin. Romeo, on the other hand, is her spouse.

What occurred in Romeo and Juliet’s Act 2 Scene 3?

Analysis and Synopsis Act II: Scene 3: As the sun rises, Romeo arrives in Friar Laurence’s cell. The Friar is gathering herbs and flowers while speculating on their medicinal and poisonous properties. Romeo confesses his love for Juliet to the Friar and begs him to marry them later that day.

Is it possible for me to go ahead now that my heart has arrived?

Is it possible for me to go ahead now that my heart has arrived? Turn back, dull earth, and find thy center out.

In Romeo and Juliet, what is the tone of Act 2 Scene 2?

The tone of the balcony scene in Act Two of William Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet is one of excitement, expectancy, and a little anxiety on the side of the audience. In terms of the characters’ moods, Romeo is enthralled by the fact that he has fallen in love with a new girl (while rapidly forgetting about the old!)

“Romeo compares Juliet to the sun.” Reference: in his soliloquy to what does romeo compare juliet what poetic element is used.

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